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Educazione degli Adulti e Tecnologie dell’Educazione: intersezioni disciplinari tra passato, presente e futuro

  • Maria Ranieri

The essay shows the historical and theoretical connections between adult education and distance learning, showing how the latter has made use of the many theories developed since the Andragogic challenge and how it has been able to offer itself as a catalyst for the former. Especially starting from MOOCs, this dual nature of distance learning – that of concretizer and that of reflective catalyst of adult education – are transformed into a research that touches pedagogical aspects (related to continuing education and its strategic role), teaching aspects (related to the methods of structuring training actions), but also and above all ethical-political apects, related to the democratization of Higher Education.

  • Keywords:
  • Distance learning,
  • MOOC,
  • open education,
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Maria Ranieri

University of Florence, Italy - ORCID: 0000-0002-8080-5436

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  • Publication Year: 2022
  • Pages: 169-180
  • Content License: CC BY 4.0
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  • Publication Year: 2022
  • Content License: CC BY 4.0
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Chapter Information

Chapter Title

Educazione degli Adulti e Tecnologie dell’Educazione: intersezioni disciplinari tra passato, presente e futuro

Authors

Maria Ranieri

Language

Italian

DOI

10.36253/979-12-215-0006-6.14

Peer Reviewed

Publication Year

2022

Copyright Information

© 2022 Author(s)

Content License

CC BY 4.0

Metadata License

CC0 1.0

Bibliographic Information

Book Title

Educazione degli Adulti: politiche, percorsi, prospettive

Book Subtitle

Studi in onore di Paolo Federighi

Editors

Vanna Boffo, Giovanna Del Gobbo, Francesca Torlone

Peer Reviewed

Number of Pages

248

Publication Year

2022

Copyright Information

© 2022 Author(s)

Content License

CC BY 4.0

Metadata License

CC0 1.0

Publisher Name

Firenze University Press

DOI

10.36253/979-12-215-0006-6

ISBN Print

979-12-215-0005-9

eISBN (pdf)

979-12-215-0006-6

eISBN (epub)

979-12-215-0007-3

Series Title

Studies on Adult Learning and Education

Series ISSN

2704-596X

Series E-ISSN

2704-5781

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