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Peripheries

  • Giuseppina Forte

Peripheries are processes and places in which conditions and actors constantly shift. The contingent forms of peripheries in this book are assembled around embodied identities and are rooted in specific genealogies: peripheries as urban fringes, periphery countries in the modern world-system theory, and peripheral urbanization. Through these genealogies, the heterogeneous forms of peripheries acquire layered meanings that decenter urban theory. Since no form can exist outside historical relations of power, it is critical to apply methodological approaches that can address the political agency emerging from embodied identities.

  • Keywords:
  • peripheries,
  • urban inequality,
  • modern world-system,
  • peripheral urbanization,
  • urban fringes,
  • cityness,
  • worlding,
  • coloniality,
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Giuseppina Forte

University of California Berkeley, United States - ORCID: 0000-0003-1330-0216

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  • Publication Year: 2022
  • Pages: 24-48

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  • Publication Year: 2022

Chapter Information

Chapter Title

Peripheries

Authors

Giuseppina Forte

Language

English

DOI

10.36253/978-88-5518-661-2.02

Peer Reviewed

Publication Year

2022

Copyright Information

© 2022 Author(s)

Content License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Metadata License

CC0 1.0

Bibliographic Information

Book Title

Embodying Peripheries

Editors

Giuseppina Forte, Kuan Hwa

Peer Reviewed

Number of Pages

304

Publication Year

2022

Copyright Information

© 2022 Author(s)

Content License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Metadata License

CC0 1.0

Publisher Name

Firenze University Press

DOI

10.36253/978-88-5518-661-2

ISBN Print

978-88-5518-660-5

eISBN (pdf)

978-88-5518-661-2

eISBN (xml)

978-88-5518-662-9

Series Title

Ricerche. Architettura, Pianificazione, Paesaggio, Design

Series ISSN

2975-0342

Series E-ISSN

2975-0350

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