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Higher Education and Work-Related Learning from Professionalism to Professionality

  • Maura Striano

Within a complex economic, political, and social scenario that requires high-level competencies as well as increasingly active citizenship, the European and international agenda for higher education needs to be renewed and re-articulated according to new goals and priorities. Higher education should offer students the opportunity to develop aptitudes and acquire advanced but flexible competencies and skills that go beyond mere professionalism and instead focus on the development of a sound professionality

  • Keywords:
  • professionality,
  • professional epistemology,
  • work-related learning,
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Maura Striano

University of Naples Federico II, Italy - ORCID: 0000-0001-7398-3288

  1. EC 2017, Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions on a renewed EU agenda for higher education, EC, Brussels.
  2. Evans L. 2008, Professionalism, professionality and the development of education professionals, «British Journal of Educational Studies», LVI (1), 20-38.
  3. Greil and Rudy 1984, Social cocoons. Encapsulation and Identity Transformation Organizations, «Sociological Inquiry», LIV (3), 260-278.
  4. Hoyle E. 1975, Professionality, professionalism and control in teaching, Houghton V. et al. (eds.) Management in Education: The Management of Organizations and Individuals, Ward Lock Educational in association with Open University Press, London.
  5. Lave J. and Wenger E. 1991, Situated Learning. Legitimate Peripheral Participation, Cambridge University Press, New York.
  6. Kinsella A. 2010, Professional knowledge and the epistemology of reflective practice, «Nursing Philosophy», XI (1), 3-14.
  7. Magnell M. 2017, Employability and work-related learning activities in higher education; how strategies differ across academic environments, «Tertiary Education and Management», XXIII (2), 103-114.
  8. Moreland N. 2005, Work-related learning in higher education, The Higher Education Academy, York.
  9. Moore T. and Morton J. 2017, The myth of job readiness? Written communication, employability and the ‘skills gap’ in higher education, «Studies in Higher Education», XLII (3), 591-609.
  10. Pratt, Rockmann and Kaufmann 2006, Constructing Professional Identity; The Role of Work and Identity Learning Circles in the Customization of Identity among Medical Residents, «Academy of Management Journal», XLIX (2), 235-262.
  11. Schön D.A. 1992, The crisis of professional knowledge and the pursuit of an epistemology of practice, «Journal of Interprofessional Care», VI (1), 49-63.
  12. Speight S, Lackovic N. and Cooker L. 2013, The Contested Curriculum: Academic learning and employability in higher education, «Tertiary Education and Management», XIX (2), 112-126.
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  • Publication Year: 2018
  • Pages: 65-74
  • Content License: CC BY 4.0
  • © 2018 Author(s)

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  • Publication Year: 2018
  • Content License: CC BY 4.0
  • © 2018 Author(s)

Chapter Information

Chapter Title

Higher Education and Work-Related Learning from Professionalism to Professionality

Authors

Maura Striano

Language

English

DOI

10.36253/978-88-6453-672-9.13

Peer Reviewed

Publication Year

2018

Copyright Information

© 2018 Author(s)

Content License

CC BY 4.0

Metadata License

CC0 1.0

Table of Contents

Book Title

Employability & Competences

Book Subtitle

Innovative Curricula for New Professions

Editors

Vanna Boffo, Monica Fedeli

Peer Reviewed

Number of Pages

510

Publication Year

2018

Copyright Information

© 2018 Author(s)

Content License

CC BY 4.0

Metadata License

CC0 1.0

Publisher Name

Firenze University Press

DOI

10.36253/978-88-6453-672-9

ISBN Print

978-88-6453-671-2

eISBN (pdf)

978-88-6453-672-9

eISBN (xml)

978-88-9273-119-6

Series Title

Studies on Adult Learning and Education

Series Issn ISSN

2704-596X

Series E-Issn

2704-5781

105

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